Cosmosis

Previous Entry
Main
Archive
Next Entry


Posted by David - April 1, 2007 - 23:08

Lighten up, it's just IR!

The IR arrays

I read the 'schematics' of the IR arrays more closely, and it seems that a certain lesser-than sign is a typo and ought to read greater-than to match the textual description of the device. I took this as permission to greatly exceed what I feared were the limits of the IR arrays capacity, and so I present some operational - perhaps not optimal - arrays hooked up to some extra domestic transformers I had lying around.

Image the leftmost: The makeshift IR arrays hooked up to power supplies of alarmingly varied volt- and amp-age.

Center image: Here the IR arrays are seen through the IR-enabled webcam. The spotlight effect is quite pronounced when they irradiate a surface so close, it works much better to cast the IR on a faraway surface so the light will be much more diffuse. Part of the problem is, of course, the webcam's stupid software adjusting itself to the relative brightness of the image rather than sticking to objective levels. (Many devices marketed to consumers do this, like when birthday candles flood the rest of an image with darkness on a home video. How annoying!)

Rightmost image: And just to show that I'm telling the truth, here's the same scene from a slightly different angle through a non-IR enabled webcam. What's interesting about this is that you can just see where the IR arrays light up the carpet in front of them, but looking with my eyes I see nothing. Clearly the IR filter on the webcam is not completely effective!

I stress tested them for a bit and none melted; their heat stabilized is a range from "somewhat warm" to "quite warm". Next step is sticking them in the VR lab to seeing how they work, perhaps it will reduce input-noise (but realistically, only some reprogramming can do that, I think).

Fortune favours the who?

So at the Art + Science symposium thing at ACAD, along with Alan I talked rather too briefly about Cosmosis, my collaboration with Andrew generally, and ASTecs very generally. We pretty much needed about twice the time we had to talk to really get the point across, but the deed is done.

I blew up the important part of the event's poster here:

See where my name is above the David Hoffos? That's just great! Anyway, at least we did a good deed and plugged the ASTecs program.

Preparing for this event struck quite clear in my mind our need to better document our work. Regardless of how good it actually turns out to be, people love hearing about the hip new techno-art stuff like it, so we need overview shots of people interacting with it (we had only a couple!), and a video thereof, shots of the code perhaps, and above all more flowcharts! So I'm going to be bringing my camera around from now on, let me tell you.

(Also I liked my line in the presentation above regarding Cosmosis as a "meta art object", a system we built in which a piece of art is created when the participant undergoes the act of viewing. Again, perhaps it makes it sound better than it is, but I shouldn't let humility cause me to forgo a good line.)



Previous Entry
Main
Archive
Next Entry